Free template letters and examples

Hand holding envelope

The legal letter templates and example documents listed below should help you negotiate a decent settlement agreement (aka compromise agreement) with your employer. They will think that you’ve hired lawyers!

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  • Grievance letters

These free grievance letter template examples will really help you to secure the settlement agreement deal which you are hoping for.

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  • Negotiation letters

These without prejudice letter templates should help you to secure the settlement agreement deal which you deserve.

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  • Redundancy

These letter templates should help you with your redundancy situation.

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  • Settlement agreements

Here are different settlement agreement templates (which used to be called compromise agreements), and between them you should have plenty to go on.

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  • Subject access requests

A subject access request is a right under the Data Protection Act 1998 to request all information that your employer holds, which relates to you.

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  • Tribunal claims

These templates are the details of claims for the ’ET1′ employment tribunals claim forms. Most people just fill in the details on the form itself, but lawyers and other people in the know actually use a separate document to set out the claim details.

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Grievance letters

These free grievance letter template examples will really help you to secure the settlement agreement deal which you are hoping for.

Grievance letter: Appeal in response to the grievance outcome letter

In response to an employer’s reply to a grievance, this is an example of an appeal letter after an employee was forced to resign.

Grievance letter: Appeal after fraud whistleblowing

This grievance appeal is with regards to an employee whom was victimised for whistleblowing that the company was overcharging customers.

Grievance letter: Flexible working discrimination

In order to look after her daughter, our client, a high-power banker requested a flexible working pattern. As she started working from home, she endured ostracising behaviour from his line manager which made her feel that she had no choice other than to negotiate a good settlement agreement to leave. This grievance letter is a key part of those negotiations.

Grievance letter: Constructive dismissal after TUPE transfer

This grievance letter is about a TUPE transfer, where our client’s employing company merged with another, and he was demoted. He also received rude emails, was bullied and threatened with a PIP (performance improvement plan). The employer's apparent aim was to force his resignation by managing him out: a good example of constructive dismissal.

Grievance letter: Made redundant after making complaint

Line manager at a bank was reported for entertaining clients in strip clubs. When an employee reported this, she was made redundant. This seemed like too much of a coincidence, and as we started to look through the redundancy and alerted them to possible claims of unfair dismissal and sex discrimination, they were quick to offer a good settlement agreement.

Grievance letter: Off sick with depression and not given a pay rise

This grievance letter is for an employee of a large telecoms company who had to be taken off work due to depression. After she found that she was passed over for a pay raise the result of this letter was a decent pay-out for her.

Grievance letter: Executive demoted & benefits changed

In this example, the employee was a Director of a large building supplies company and he found his package of benefits was changed unilaterally. He had to quit and submit this grievance to get an excellent settlement package. Possible claims include constructive dismissal, breach of contract & disability discrimination.

Grievance letter: Redundancy appeal for pre-determined consultation

Our client’s redundancy consultation was found to be inadequate following a predetermined process regarding redundancy occurred. He was unfairly singled out, and a colleague of his was instructed to unofficially take over his job, which gave rise to a grievance appeal.

Grievance letter: Sales person with commission cut

Without first conferring with him, our client, an English sales manager, had his commission restructured by an American Software Company. The client had the potential to claim for nationality discrimination, constructive dismissal and a breach of contract, and therefore, with this grievance successfully negotiated an exit package and a job to be lined up for him when he left.

Grievance letter: Bullied and discriminated against for depression

Our client’s working life was made difficult when he began to suffer depression. This grievance letter with a without prejudice letter sets out the amount of money our client requests for settlement negotiations.

Grievance letter: Suspended, back injury and equal pay

Our client suffered a back injury due to working too many hours, and therefore had to take time off. Consequently, he was demoted to an inferior role in which he was receiving less than his female counterparts rather than attempting to accommodate this injury. He was later suspended for breaching confidentiality when he attempted to discuss this with his colleagues. Therefore, this grievance letter comes with a without prejudice letter, setting out how much money and why the employee is asking for.

Grievance appeal letter: Discrimination, bullying and constructive dismissal

Whilst on sick leave and in work, our client was bullied, harassed and discriminated against. She therefore raised a grievance and was very unhappy about the response.

Grievance appeal letter: Maternity leave, mishandled return, indirect sex discrimination

On return from maternity leave, it was expected that she worked full time, and no hand over of responsibilities had occurred. This had a detrimental effect on her family life. With the evidence she had of the failure of management to communicate with her and put adequate procedures in place to facilitate her return, she applied for a grievance on the grounds of indirect sex discrimination.

Grievance letter: Bullying and harassment

Due to long term workplace bullying, the client suffered various ill health issues and work-related stress which are detailed in this substantial grievance letter.

Grievance appeal letter: Changes to employment terms and conditions

Without consultation, our client’s job role had been changed. This gave rise to a grievance hearing, which was not upheld. Our client appealed this decision due to the lack of objectivity needed to make a just decision as to their involvement in the redeployment and management of the client’s team that the decision maker allowed with regards to variation of job roles.

Negotiation letters

These without prejudice letter templates should help you to secure the settlement agreement deal which you deserve.

Without prejudice letter no.1 in series: Letter from employee’s solicitor to employer

Our client previously submitted a grievance. This letter is a grievance appeal written on behalf of our client.

Without prejudice letter: TUPE, redundancy and corporate takeover

After our client had been successfuly employed for 8 years, his company was taken over by a large corporation. He was made redundant, but should have been protected by TUPE legislation. This letter proposes a settlement agreement exit package as he was unfairly dismissed in the circumstances.

Without prejudice letter: Whistleblowing and disability discrimination

On behalf of two employees we are seeking a good settlement agreement and exit package following their ill-treatment, discrimination, and complaints of other detriments, because they had blown the whistle on corruption and malpractice in their workplace.

Without prejudice letter: Off sick with stress after bullying

In addition to an increased workload, our client endured bullying and adverse comments on Facebook as well as in the office by her line manager which all resulted in her being signed off sick with stress. This without prejudice letter proposes a settlement ex gratia payment of 6 months salary and contractual benefits such as notice pay.

Without prejudice letter: Requesting release from restrictive covenants after whistleblowing

Our client blew the whistle on fraud, an investigation commenced and he was offered a settlement agreement. In this without prejudice letter we respond on his behalf proposing a higher payment and requesting release from some of the restrictive covenants in his employment contract.

Without prejudice letter: Dismissed, reinstated on appeal and resigned

Following a disciplinary investigation, our client was suspended then dismissed. He was later reinstated when he appealed this decision. The conduct of the employer was such that our client later resigned and this without prejudice letter proposes a fair settlement payment.

Without prejudice letter: Made redundant on maternity leave

This without prejudice letter was written by us for a client who was told that she was being made redundant whilst she was on maternity leave (an all too common occurrence unfortunately). The employer tried to misrepresent her job role, saying that she was admin support, whereas in fact her appraisals showed that her role was more managerial. Furthermore she was not put in a pool with other employees, or offered meaningful alternative employment.

Without prejudice letter: Sham redundancy – bullying and stress

There was no real decrease in our client’s workload, however, he was made redundant. This employee had previously made complaints about bullying and harassment, and this letter concerns how this led him to being singled out for redundancy, when in fact the true aim was unfair dismissal on behalf of the employer.

Without prejudice letter: Tax savings for out of court settlements

Speaking in the employer’s language, this without prejudice letter explains how significant tax savings could be made by agreeing to this letter and singing a settlement agreement with you.

Without prejudice letter: Sham redundancy selection

Our client was asked to participate in a sham redundancy selection process. This without prejudice letter aims to prevent tribunal claims before they may arise and suggests that an out of court settlement may be more useful. Possible claims that may arise in these circumstances include those of constructive dismissal, whistleblowing and disability discrimination.

Without prejudice letter: Unpaid commission and bonus

This without prejudice letter is for your employer, if -like our client - you are an employee who is owed a specific sum of money, including commission payments or bonus payments. We attached to this letter an ET1 employment tribunal claim form which not only makes the prospect of court action more realistic to the employers, but also prepares a claimant to go ahead and issue a claim if the employer won't otherwise settle.

Without prejudice letter no.5 in series: Third letter from employee’s solicitor to employer

Our client was made a counter-offer settlement by his employer, which is outlined in this letter.

Without prejudice letter no.4 in series: Response from employer to employee’s solicitor

This without prejudice letter is the employer’s lawyer’s counter offer in response to our original exit settlement proposal.

Without prejudice letter no.3 in series: Second letter from employee’s solicitor to employer

Our client’s employer offered a counter-settlement, to which this without prejudice letter is out response.

Without prejudice letter no.2 in series: Response from employer to employee’s solicitor

We proposed an exit settlement agreement, and the employer’s response to this is within the without prejudice letter.

Without prejudice letter: Unfairly dismissed and reinstated on appeal

This without prejudice letter is written on behalf of a client who was unfairly dismissed, reinstated on appeal and then had to resign. Numerous serious breaches of the employment contract were committed by the employer, including: breach of trust, failure to follow the disciplinary and grievance procedures put in place and acting in an arbitrary manner. All of this cumulated in the decision to reinstate our client following his resignation. In order to reflect the basic award and the loss of statutory rights and earning we proposed a settlement agreement on his behalf.

Without prejudice letter: Mishandled grievance and unfair constructive dismissal

Our client raised a grievance after issues at work affected his health. The grievance was mishandled, so we wrote a without prejudice letter on his behalf of which upheld that the delay in response to his grievance letter increased his anxiety and lead to a loss of trust in his employer’s ability to adequately support his return to work. We proposed a settlement agreement of 6-month salary and other benefits, given the evidence the client had to support a claim for constructive unfair dismissal.

Without prejudice letter: Raised a grievance and breach of confidentiality

Our client was offered a settlement agreement after the employer exacerbated his anxiety via breach of his confidentiality. We rejected this offer and after raising a grievance wrote a response on his behalf. We brought to their attention our aims to resolve the matter swiftly and that doing so would save them a lot of time and expense, and therefore, offered a counter-proposal. This proposal included; full salary, payment of the difference in bonus between the current and next year, termination date including holiday pay, 6 months salary, contribution to legal costs and a reference.

Without prejudice letter: Demoted whilst on sick leave, settlement proposal

On behalf of a client, we put forth an exit settlement in the form of this without prejudice letter, which included a counter offer. Our client was demoted and given a written warning along with a threat of being sacked before the grievance appeal concluded, whilst he was taken of sick due to work related issues. The company failed to aid him in his search for alternative employment as they promised, therefore, the settlement agreement they proposed was rejected. Instead we suggested that the final settlement should consider the statutory redundancy, loss of income, outstanding bonuses, future losses, outstanding annual leave and pension contributions be considered.

Without prejudice letter: Unfair redundancy procedure

Our client was unfairly made redundant, and the procedure in which this redundancy was made was unfair. This is expressed in this letter, in which we bring to their attention the unnecessary delays and lack of communication causing the client anxiety and stress; no attempt to consider alternative placements were made; a total lack of consultation procedures. In this letter we suggested that the settlement agreement, starting with a 6months salary pay be made, was inadequate, and that to reflect the less of statutory rights and benefits, as well as to cover the legal costs the client incurred this should be increased.

Without prejudice email: Unfair constructive dismissal based on discrimination

Our client’s employer proposed a settlement agreement. In a without prejudice response, we seek to improve the employer's offer by arguing that our client could claim for unfair constructive dismissal, based on sex and disability discrimination. The outcome was a much better settlement payment than the client had initially been offered.

Redundancy

These letter templates should help you with your redundancy situation.

Redundancy appeal 2nd response: Final outcome

This letter is the employer’s reply to our letter appealing against redundancy from our case whereby the client was being made redundant after he blew the whistle on malpractice. The employer was also trying to offer him only 3 months’ notice pay, when in fact it was supposed to be 3 years! This is one of a series of 4 letters in this case (2 from each side), j), k) and l) are the rest of this case.

Redundancy appeal 1st letter: Notice period & whistleblowing

This letter is from our a case whereby our client was being made redundant after he blew the whistle on malpractice. The employer was also trying to offer him only 3 months’ notice pay, when in fact it was supposed to be 3 years! This is first in a series of letters in this case, k), l) and m) are the rest of this case.

Redundancy appeal 2nd letter: Notice period & whistleblowing

This letter is from our a case whereby our client was being made redundant after he blew the whistle on malpractice. The employer was also trying to offer him only 3 months’ notice pay, when in fact it was supposed to be 3 years! This is one of a series of 4 letters in this case (2 from each side), j), k) and m) are the rest of this case.

Redundancy appeal 1st response: Short notice period

After a client was made redundant for whistleblowing about malpractice, we sent this letter of response as the 3-year notice pay was ignored, and he was instead offered 3months. The exchanged letters include J), L) and M

Redundancy on maternity: Without prejudice letter

When our client took maternity from her managing role at a UK international company branch, she was made redundant. Writing to the employer, we highlighted that this amounted to unfair dismissal and that there were visible faults in the redundancy proceedings.

Settlement agreements

Here are different settlement agreement templates (which used to be called compromise agreements), and between them you should have plenty to go on.

Settlement agreement template: for employees with long garden leave or notice period

This is for people who are going on a long garden leave or working out their notice, rather than finishing work straight away. Essentially you sign the first part when originally agreeing to the deal, and then you sign the second part after you have come to the end of your employment. It is supposed to ensure that you don’t do anything bad in between. It is fairly complicated however, and we would urge you to seek specialist legal advice about this.

Subject access request: Example 4

Use these free subject access request templates to obtain the information you need for negotiation.

Settlement agreement template: Inc. shares and company car

Primarily for client’s whom have senior executive employee positions, or shares they wish to negotiate as part of their exit package. Employer’s behaviour was not appropriate, and therefore agreed to giving the company car out of good measure.

Settlement agreement template: Inc. pension payment

This settlement agreement includes a tax free ex gratia payment of over £30,000 into an employee’s pension fund. The template is mainly for employees near retirement. It isn’t most appropriate for younger employees as pension money won't be accessible to them for a long time.

Settlement agreement template: Standard version 2

This is a variation of the 1st standard template, which again can be adapted for use in many everyday agreements.

Settlement agreement template: Standard version 1

This settlement includes many terms and clauses which feature in ordinary agreements and can readily be adapted for your own use in such circumstances.

Subject access requests

A subject access request is a right under the Data Protection Act 1998 to request all information that your employer holds, which relates to you.

Subject access request: Example 3

Use these free subject access request templates to obtain the information you need for negotiation.

Subject access request: Example 2

Use these free subject access request templates to obtain the information you need for negotiating a fair settlement.

Subject access request: Example 1

Use these free subject access request templates to obtain the information you need for negotiating a fair exit package

Tribunal claims

These templates are the details of claims for the ’ET1′ employment tribunals claim forms. Most people just fill in the details on the form itself, but lawyers and other people in the know actually use a separate document to set out the claim details.

ET1 claim form: Unfair redundancy and equal pay claim

As a way of getting rid of her, this employee was selected for redundancy. She therefore made an equal pay claim as upon dismissal she found that she was being paid less than her male counterparts.

ET1 claim form: Sales commission structure changed after developing depression

This template was used for our client, a sales man, whom was taken off work for a few weeks with depression. To his horror, on return the company had restructured his commission, which had a detrimental effect on his take home pay. In bringing this issue to their attention, any deliberate act was denied and therefore he brought a claim for disability discrimination (for damages to injury to feelings) and unlawful deduction of wages/breach of contract (for the commission lost). For good measure, as he felt that he had no choice but to resign, he also claimed for constructive dismissal and a written statement of employment particulars (not issuing him a contract of employment)

ET1 claim form: Withholding commissions

Our client, an employee at an events manager company, had her employer withhold her commission after she decided to voluntarily leave. With this form, we eventually got this withheld commission back.

ET1 claim form: Race discrimination, breach of contract & withholding commissions

Our client was ostensibly fired from a big recruitment company for having an affair with a client. However, our client claims that it was because he was of Arabic descent and so that his boss could take credit for all his commission.

ET1 claim form: Details of whistleblowing claim

With less than one year’s service, our client was dismissed due to performance, when in fact he blew the whistle on bad practice in a private hospital. He brought a claim for unfair dismissal

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